Workplace Ergonomics and Caster Technology Blog

MHI Solutions Recent Issue Focuses on Ergonomic Industrial Cart and Caster Solutions

MHI Solutions Recent Issue Focuses on Ergonomic Industrial Cart and Caster Solutions

MHI Solutions Magazine recently published an article written by Jean Feingold which focused on ergonomic industrial cart and caster solutions. The article highlights some often overlooked cart and caster ergonomic considerations in the manual material handling industry. Feingold interviewed some leaders in the field of industrial ergonomics including Terry Parmelee of Kinetic Technologies and Lui Dilauro of Darcor Limited, Read on to check out the highlights and read the complete article.
New Methods for Assessing Risks Needed in Industrial Ergonomics

New Methods for Assessing Risks Needed in Industrial Ergonomics

Identifying musculoskeletal injury risk factors associated with MMH is an important component of any industrial ergonomics program that targets the reduction of workplace injuries. MMH tasks are often compound tasks or aggregates of several different tasks. For example, an MMH task might consist of loading boxes onto a cart, pushing the cart to a first location, maneuvering the cart around corners, unloading a few boxes, pushing the cart to a second location, and unloading or loading boxes there. Compound MMH patterns of this type are routinely seen in industrial workplaces. Currently, separate tools are used to individually evaluate each simple component of MMH tasks, such as each instance of lifting, carrying, pushing, and pulling. Applying the tools to a compound task yields several separate risk assessments, e.g. one for the lifting component and another for the pushing component. How should the combination of these individual analyses be evaluated to estimate the risk of injury for the compound task which includes multiple tasks, e.g. both lifting and pushing?
Trending at AEC 2018: Proactive Ergonomics and Leveraging Technologies for Better Workplace Ergonomics

Trending at AEC 2018: Proactive Ergonomics and Leveraging Technologies for Better Workplace Ergonomics

AEC 2018 Highlights Include the ROI of Ergonomics, Creative Improvements to Support Workplace Ergonomics and a Closer Look at Push Pull Guidelines The team from Darcor recently returned from the 2018 Applied Ergo Conference (AEC) in late March in Atlanta. As always, the AEC brought together the greatest minds in the field of ergonomics. These ergonomists and engineers attend the AEC to get the opportunity to cross-pollinate ideas, policies, technologies, advancements in the field of ergonomics. The 2018 AEC was no exception with booths, presentations, exhibits, success stories and the Ergo Cup® Awards all serving the purpose of advancing ergonomics to support reduction in injuries. Read on to find out about ergonomic trends, Ergo Cup awards, and presentation highlights from AEC 2018
Get Ready for AEC 2018!

Get Ready for AEC 2018!

The 2018 Applied Ergo Conference (AEC) is set to run March 26 – 29, 2018 at the Hilton in Atlanta, Georgia. As always, the Darcor team is ready to be inspired by the exciting keynote speakers and workshops. For more than a decade, the Global Organization of Ergonomics (GOErgo) has been bringing ergonomic considerations to the forefront for businesses. More than ever, organizations have become more focused on injury prevention and reducing workplace related fatigue. AEC continues to lead the charge on proactive ergonomics assessment and solutions. Darcor has been proud to be part of the ergonomics progression and has developed the Economics of Ergonomics Guide which will help organizations truly understand the financial risks associated with workplace overexertion injuries and how to assess and reduce that risk by implementing proactive ergonomics programs. As AEC 2018 approaches, the Darcor team has compiled a list of the workshops and speakers we’re most looking forward to see:
Economics of Ergonomics Guide Now Available to Support Cost Justification for Crucial Ergonomic Solutions

Economics of Ergonomics Guide Now Available to Support Cost Justification for Crucial Ergonomic Solutions

Workplace ergonomics thought leader, Darcor Casters and Wheels, is pleased to introduce the Economics of Ergonomics Guide. The free 14-page download will help organizations truly understand the financial risks associated with workplace overexertion injuries and how to assess and reduce that risk by implementing proactive ergonomics programs. Overexertion injuries, including those related to pushing and pulling, are the costliest of workplace injuries. It is critical to manage the financial risk of workplace overexertion injuries in the manual material handling industry. It is estimated that organizations can expect to save $460 USD a year per worker by ensuring that push pull peak forces are consistently at an acceptable level. The Economics of Ergonomics Guide covers a variety of crucial areas that all organizations involved in manual material handling should be well-versed on to ensure reduced risk of workplace overexertion injuries and related costs. Download the guide now!
Lean Manufacturing: Creating the Conversation for Change

Lean Manufacturing: Creating the Conversation for Change

By Scott Smith | Continuous Improvement | February 20th, 2018 | Comments (0)
A lean management system creates alignment to a common purpose, creates transparency on what the organization’s problems are, and engages all employees through active involvement in solving the organization’s roadblocks to achieve their purpose. Lean manufacturing and continuous improvement go hand-in-hand. To start their lean journey, Darcor established both production planning and performance control boards in primary production areas. The performance control boards provide teams with measures that support the organization’s strategic direction and a method to solve problems. To be effective, the lean management system needs an operating rhythm that creates conversations and transparency on what is important and encourages accountability and action. Darcor’s team is better aligned to move at the speed that is required to maintain high levels of customer satisfaction. The climate for the organization has improved and the culture has transformed to recognize and encourage active problem solvers in the operations environment.
Industrial Ergonomics: Best Practices for Cart Management

Industrial Ergonomics: Best Practices for Cart Management

Manual material handling using carts is a prime example of an occupational push and pull task. Managing the risk associated with pushing, pulling and maneuvering carts in the workplace is a critical component of an industrial ergonomics program. As most facilities or organizations have fleets of carts, a systematic approach is useful in managing and reducing the risks associated with cart handling. While such a system will vary to suit the idiosyncrasies of different operations, there are some common components to these ergonomics cart management programs. So, what are some best practices for cart ergonomics?
Industrial Ergonomics Regulations around the World

Industrial Ergonomics Regulations around the World

By Tom Albin | Workplace Ergonomics | December 12th, 2017 | Comments (0)
Understanding manual material handling and cart ergonomics standards everywhere is the key to minimizing risk of injury. Injuries related to manual materials handling (MMH) tasks are a major concern in industrial ergonomics. 3 out of every 4 individuals whose jobs include MMH tasks suffer pain due to back injury at some time, accounting for about 1/3 of all lost work and more than 1/3 of all compensation costs. In addition, there are major productivity losses associated with back injuries. Pushing and pulling tasks can be a major contributor to back injury in MMH tasks. So, what is a safe level of push/pull force?
How Reliable is Your Measurement of Forces to Maneuver Carts?

How Reliable is Your Measurement of Forces to Maneuver Carts?

By Tom Albin | Workplace Ergonomics | November 21st, 2017 | Comments (0)
Effective management of manual cart handling ergonomic programs relies on measuring the forces required to move carts manually. Forces that exceed acceptable levels are more likely to result in injury and may also adversely affect productivity. An accurate, reliable measurement of the force required to manually move carts is essential for the effective use of the Liberty Mutual Tables or any other tools that evaluate the acceptable level of the forces required to move carts. But, how reliable is your measurement of the forces exerted to maneuver carts in your facilities?
Aviation Ergonomics: The Ups and Downs of Manual Cart Handling in the Airline Industry

Aviation Ergonomics: The Ups and Downs of Manual Cart Handling in the Airline Industry

By Tom Albin | Workplace Ergonomics | October 17th, 2017 | Comments (0)
Aircraft manufacturers need to consider the risk of injury in manual material handling tasks. Wheels move all types of things in all types of places. There are some unique situations involving manually handling wheeled objects in aviation, both in manufacturing and in the operation of commercial aircraft. There are risks of overexertion injuries resulting from pushing and pulling when the tasks are not well designed, controlled and managed.
©2018 Copyright. All rights reserved.